Emilie Du Sagittarius, Scientist, Proto-Woman

“If I were king, I would reform an abuse which effectively cuts back half of humanity. I would have women participate in all human rights, and above all, those of the mind.”

Emilie Du Chatelet – The Woman Science Forgot

History Crushes are important because they are so damn inspirational. People who defied convention and found their ultra in far less fluid times lend us strength today.

Emilie Du Chatelet became widely known as the lover of Voltaire, the muck-raking multiple Scorpio polemicist, but her true strength was a a genius mathematician and advocate for women’s rights …in an era when there really was no such thing.

Told she could not study Mathematics (too unfeminine) this Sagittarius with a S-Load of Taurus (Moon, North Node, Mars and Saturn) studied it anyway. Then she became a physicist, philosopher and author, playing a vital role in the development of 18th Century science and culture.

She had kids, she lobbied hard for girls secondary school education, she wrote a critical analysis of the entire bible, published a book on “happiness for women” and devised “an ingenious financing arrangement” to pay off her gambling debts. She basically invented financial derivatives.

Horribly, this super-gifted and audacious woman died in childbirth at her Uranus Opposition, in her early 40s.

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14 thoughts on “Emilie Du Sagittarius, Scientist, Proto-Woman

  1. Oh I love this. As a woman in the trading and cryptocurrency world, I am always interested in the women who dare to play on this field and question the ‘status quo’ of the accepted financial system. Who knew that it was a woman who kicked off derivatives?

  2. Whilst most of her endeavours are worthy derivatives are not something to claim fame over. It’s rather like the bloke who put lead INTO petrol; in an abstract sense.

  3. France was a really interesting place for women’s rights in that period. Officially, and, generally speaking, practically, women were not supposed to be part of the intellectual world. But we have Emilie Du Chatelet. And we also have the rise of salons [link], especially in France. Women were the driving force of the salons, which usually took place in their homes. If women couldn’t go to the Sorbonne (or other colleges), then they could make the graduates thereof, along with other luminaries, come to them.

  4. I didn’t know much about her but thank you for bringing her to my attention, her wikipedia is fascinating. Truly ahead of her time and inspirational to say the least!

  5. You are incredible Mystic.
    Thank you for this.

    Currently considering learning to code and eventually taking the exam to begin working as in cyber security. Something I wouldn’t ever have imagined concievable – ever. But yes. I’m also super turned on by psychotherapy and would love to start that in my mid fifties which I feel is the perfect age to become a psychotherapist, perhaps a parent too although adoption has only ever been the method of asending to motherhood status. I intuitively knew even as a child that my biological and emotional clocks were set in different time zones and trying to force cooperation would be disastrous..
    Estate agents knocking on my door..hang on. X

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